10 Ways to Be More Successful at Work

1) Define Success.
8) Limit the Personal on Work Time.
3) E-mail Etiquette.
4) Stay Positive.
5) Skip the Gossip.
6) Congratulate Yourself.
7) It's Not Personal.
2) Be on Time.
9) Follow Through.
10) Say Please and Thank You.
1) Define Success. 8) Limit the Personal on Work Time. 3) E-mail Etiquette. 4) Stay Positive. 5) Skip the Gossip. 6) Congratulate Yourself. 7) It's Not Personal. 2) Be on Time. 9) Follow Through. 10) Say Please and Thank You.
By Rebecca Arora September 30, 2008
Either during the interview or at the beginning of the job, a winner discovers what is expected of her. She’s likely to ask her manager, “How can I be successful in this role?” Even if it’s not a new job, it’s never too late to check in with the boss and ask how you can better contribute to the success of your team or company.
The all-star is not yapping to her friends, IMing her pals, or fiddling around on Facebook all day. She saves personal communication and tasks for the lunch hour and thereby makes it clear to herself and others that she’s there to contribute to the team.
While e-mail is a useful tool, written messages can sometimes be misunderstood or construed in the wrong way. If something is urgent, just pick up the phone or meet face to face. Direct communication is the most underrated way to remove obstacles at work. Avoid using all caps in e-mail—they project a harsh or angry tone. And never hit the Send button when you’ve written an e-mail in haste or frustration. Wait until you cool off and can think or write objectively.
Have you ever not enjoyed working with an enthusiastic or genuinely upbeat person? Being positive is a choice. Each day brings dozens of challenges. Choosing to focus on the positive helps solutions surface. Keep in mind that positive words can be very powerful for oral communication as well as written communication with co-workers.
If you talk about Joe to Mary, Mary will secretly wonder, Hmm … if he’s talking about Joe like this, I wonder what he says about me behind my back. The best way to win friends and loyal fans is to say only good things about others—or nothing at all.
An overachiever constantly criticizes herself and her actions. A powerful way to change this habit is to compliment yourself when you’ve done a good job. Perhaps you just gave an effective presentation or managed to smooth out a confrontation. Taking inventory throughout the day brings greater awareness to what you do and helps you acknowledge life’s victories, big or small.
Sometimes we get so wrapped up in what we do that we use our jobs as a lens through which we see ourselves. Yes, career and jobs are important, but they are things we do, not who we are. Even if you pour heart and soul into a project or company and it fails, it does not mean that you are a failure. Keeping a little distance between work and self makes you more open to feedback and helps you see work challenges as an opportunity to learn and grow.
When you’re late for a meeting, you’re indirectly saying, “I don’t respect the value of your time.” Even if the other person isn’t on time, you should be. Time is money. This holds true for meetings both at work and outside work.
If you say you’re going to do something, do it. Don’t ignore it and pretend others won’t notice or care. Finishing what you start makes you reliable, dependable, and irreplaceable.
These simple phrases are often overlooked. Honestly, how much more motivated do you feel when someone asks you with a “please” and later acknowledges you with “thank you”? We’re all human, and if you want results from others, this is an almost effortless way to get it.
What makes a person shine at work? She’s not necessarily the office genius, yet people enjoy working with her and would refer her to anyone who’s looking for a good hire. What’s the secret of her success? Here are a handful of a superstar’s tips and tricks.
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